Coffee production

This site is dedicated to one of the most precious human invention - the magic beverage named COFFEE! For all the coffee lovers we've collected some interesting facts about coffee and coffee business and history. And so... Thai cuisine is the national cuisine of Thailand. This made Thai as the cooking tradition with most dish that successfully made it to the list. Non-glutinous rice (Oryza sativa) is called khao chao (lit. The traditional recipe for a rice dish could include as many as 30 varieties of rice.[30] That number has been drastically reduced due to genetic modifications. These venues have a large display showing the different dishes from which one can choose.

Early History

The first coffee crops were planted in the eastern part of the country. In 1835 the first commercial production was registered with 2,560 green coffee bags that were exported from the port of Cucuta, near the border with Venezuela. We think of all parts of the meal as a whole - sum rap Thai (the way Thais eat), is the term we use for the unique components that make up a characteristically Thai meal. Today, however, most Thais eat with a fork and spoon. They often feature as a garnish, especially with one-dish meals. The fork and spoon were introduced by King Chulalongkorn after his return from a tour of Europe in 1897 CE. We think of all parts of the meal as a whole - sum rap Thai (the way Thais eat), is the term we use for the unique components that make up a characteristically Thai meal. The production of these sectors went into period of decline when the respective bonanza of their international prices terminated, hence a true industrial consolidation was prevented.

The crisis

The crisis that affected the large estates brought with it one of the most significant changes of the Colombian coffee industry. Simplicity isn't the dictum here, at all. Thai meals typically consist of rice (khao in Thai) with many complementary dishes shared by all. They were introduced to Thailand by the Hokkien people starting in the 15th century, and by the Teochew people who started settling in larger numbers from the late 18th century CE onward, mainly in the towns and cities, and now form the majority of the Thai Chinese.[10][11][12] Such dishes include chok Thai: โจ๊ก (rice porridge), salapao (steamed buns), kuaitiao rat na (fried rice-noodles) and khao kha mu (stewed pork with rice). They are similar to the Teochew mee pok. Common flavors in Thai food come from garlic, galangal, coriander/cilantro, lemon grass, shallots, pepper, kaffir lime leaves, shrimp paste, fish sauce, and chilies.

National Federation

The National Federation of Coffee Growers of Colombia is a non-profit business association, popularly known for its "Juan Valdez" marketing campaign. The federation was founded in 1927 as a business cooperative that promotes the production and exportation of Colombian coffee. It currently represents more than 500,000 producers, most of whom are small family owned farms. The federation supports research and development in the production of coffee through grants to local universities and through federation sponsored research institutes.

Many dishes that are now popular in Thailand were originally Chinese dishes. They often feature as a garnish, especially with one-dish meals. Stews of meat, plantains, and root vegetables are the platos nacionales of several countries in Central America, South America, and the Caribbean: Colombian ajiaco, and the sancocho of the Dominican Republic, Colombia, and Panama. When time is limited or when eating alone, single dishes, such as fried rice or noodle soups, are quick and filling. Simplicity isn't the dictum here, at all.

The federation also monitors production to ensure export quality standards are met. The Federation was founded with three objectives: 1) to protect the industry, 2) to study its problems, and 3) to further its interests.[15] The Juan Valdez branding concept was developed in 1981 to distinguish 100% Colombian coffee from coffee blended with beans from other countries. The trademark made its first TV appearance in 1983 featuring a country farmer carrying coffee on his mule.